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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 967814, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/967814
Research Article

Biofunctionalized Nanofibers Using Arthrospira (Spirulina) Biomass and Biopolymer

1Laboratory of Microbiology and Biochemical, College of Chemistry and Food Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande, P.O. Box 474, 96203-900 Rio Grande, RS, Brazil
2Department of Chemistry, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Hans Meerwein Straße, 35032 Marburg, Germany
3Hematology and Stem Cell Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90610-000 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
4Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Food Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande, P.O. Box 474, 96203-900 Rio Grande, RS, Brazil

Received 11 July 2014; Revised 22 August 2014; Accepted 20 September 2014

Academic Editor: Ulrich Kneser

Copyright © 2015 Michele Greque de Morais et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Electrospun nanofibers composed of polymers have been extensively researched because of their scientific and technical applications. Commercially available polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate (PHB-HV) copolymers are good choices for such nanofibers. We used a highly integrated method, by adjusting the properties of the spinning solutions, where the cyanophyte Arthrospira (formally Spirulina) was the single source for nanofiber biofunctionalization. We investigated nanofibers using PHB extracted from Spirulina and the bacteria Cupriavidus necator and compared the nanofibers to those made from commercially available PHB and PHB-HV. Our study assessed nanofiber formation and their selected thermal, mechanical, and optical properties. We found that nanofibers produced from Spirulina PHB and biofunctionalized with Spirulina biomass exhibited properties which were equal to or better than nanofibers made with commercially available PHB or PHB-HV. Our methodology is highly promising for nanofiber production and biofunctionalization and can be used in many industrial and life science applications.