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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1054597, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1054597
Clinical Study

Postoperative Delirium in Elderly Patients Undergoing Hip Fracture Surgery in the Sugammadex Era: A Retrospective Study

1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Konkuk University Medical Center, 120-1 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 05030, Republic of Korea
2Institute of Biomedical Science and Technology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea

Received 30 October 2015; Accepted 27 January 2016

Academic Editor: Gabriele Piffaretti

Copyright © 2016 Chung-Sik Oh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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