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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1503956, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1503956
Research Article

Effect of 48 h Fasting on Autonomic Function, Brain Activity, Cognition, and Mood in Amateur Weight Lifters

Institute of Sports Science and Innovations, Lithuanian Sports University, Sporto Str. 6, Kaunas, Lithuania

Received 10 July 2016; Revised 10 October 2016; Accepted 9 November 2016

Academic Editor: Abdel A. Abdel-Rahman

Copyright © 2016 Rima Solianik et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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