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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1512690, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1512690
Research Article

Enteric Pathogens and Coinfections in Foals with and without Diarrhea

1Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP, Brazil
2Department of Veterinary Hygiene and Public Health, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP, Brazil
3Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
4Department of Genetics, Evolution and Bioagents, Campinas State University (Unicamp), Campinas, SP, Brazil
5Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
6Department of Animal Hygiene, Kitasato University, Towada, Aomori, Japan

Received 15 September 2016; Accepted 23 November 2016

Academic Editor: Eric N. Villegas

Copyright © 2016 Giovane Olivo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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