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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1752854, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1752854
Review Article

Roles and Clinical Applications of OPG and TRAIL as Biomarkers in Cardiovascular Disease

Department of Medical, Surgical and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Cattinara Teaching Hospital, Strada di Fiume, 34149 Trieste, Italy

Received 29 January 2016; Revised 28 March 2016; Accepted 5 April 2016

Academic Editor: Laurent Metzinger

Copyright © 2016 Stella Bernardi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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