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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2015251, 6 pages
Research Article

Clinical Characteristics and 30-Day Outcomes of Intermittent Hemodialysis for Acute Kidney Injury in an African Intensive Care Unit

1Department of Anaesthesia, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda
2Dialysis and Intensive Care Unit, International Hospital Kampala, P.O. Box 8177, Kampala, Uganda
3Departments of Physiology and Internal Medicine Nephrology Unit, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda

Received 19 November 2015; Revised 4 February 2016; Accepted 8 February 2016

Academic Editor: Jeremiah R. Brown

Copyright © 2016 Arthur Kwizera et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Introduction. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common occurrence in the intensive care unit (ICU). Studies have looked at outcomes of renal replacement therapy using intermittent haemodialysis (IHD) in ICUs with varying results. Little is known about the outcomes of using IHD in resource-limited settings where continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is limited. We sought to determine outcomes of IHD among critically ill patients admitted to a low-income country ICU. Methods. A retrospective review of patient records was conducted. Patients admitted to the ICU who underwent IHD for AKI were included in the study. Patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics, cause of AKI, laboratory parameters, haemodialysis characteristics, and survival were interpreted and analyzed. Primary outcome was mortality. Results. Of 62 patients, 40 had complete records. Median age of patients was 38.5 years. Etiologic diagnoses associated with AKI included sepsis, malaria, and ARDS. Mortality was 52.5%. APACHE II (OR 4.550; 95% CI 1.2–17.5, ), mechanical ventilation (OR 13.063; 95% CI 2.3–72, ), and need for vasopressors (OR 16.8; 95% CI 3.4–82.6, ) had statistically significant association with mortality. Conclusion. IHD may be a feasible alternative for RRT in critically ill haemodynamically stable patients in low resource settings where CRRT may not be available.