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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 2719895, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2719895
Research Article

Altered Resting-State Amygdala Functional Connectivity after Real-Time fMRI Emotion Self-Regulation Training

1China National Digital Switching System Engineering and Technological Research Center, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, China
2Department of Radiology, People’s Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, China

Received 20 November 2015; Accepted 24 January 2016

Academic Editor: Toshimasa Yamazaki

Copyright © 2016 Zhonglin Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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