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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 3702789, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3702789
Research Article

Transcriptome Analysis of Ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. Gaud.) in Response to Ramie Moth (Cocytodes coerulea Guenée) Infestation

1Institute of Bast Fiber Crops, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Changsha, Hunan 410205, China
2Hunan Academy of Forestry Science, Changsha, Hunan 410004, China

Received 5 October 2015; Revised 13 December 2015; Accepted 1 February 2016

Academic Editor: Pulugurtha B. Kirti

Copyright © 2016 Liangbin Zeng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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