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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 3830682, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3830682
Research Article

Pacemaker Created in Human Ventricle by Depressing Inward-Rectifier K+ Current: A Simulation Study

1Biocomputing Research Center, School of Computer Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, China
2School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK

Received 26 November 2015; Revised 19 January 2016; Accepted 20 January 2016

Academic Editor: Dobromir Dobrev

Copyright © 2016 Yue Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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