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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 4287461, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4287461
Research Article

Phenolic Compounds and In Vitro Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activities of Three Tropic Fruits: Persimmon, Guava, and Sweetsop

Liwan District Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 510176, China

Received 26 May 2016; Revised 12 July 2016; Accepted 3 August 2016

Academic Editor: Paul M. Tulkens

Copyright © 2016 Li Fu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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