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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 4574138, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4574138
Research Article

Health Issues of Primary School Students Residing in Proximity of an Oil Terminal with Environmental Exposure to Volatile Organic Compounds

1Mutagenesis Unit, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Istituto Nazionale Ricerca sul Cancro, 16132 Genoa, Italy
2Clinical Epidemiology Unit, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Istituto Nazionale Ricerca sul Cancro, 16132 Genoa, Italy
3Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
4Epidemiology Unit, Azienda Sanitaria 3 Genovese, 16149 Genoa, Italy

Received 18 March 2016; Accepted 9 June 2016

Academic Editor: Peter P. Egeghy

Copyright © 2016 Massimo Cipolla et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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