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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4658506, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4658506
Research Article

Positive Selection and Centrality in the Yeast and Fly Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

Department of Biology, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, USA

Received 29 December 2015; Accepted 7 March 2016

Academic Editor: Luoying Zhang

Copyright © 2016 Sandip Chakraborty and David Alvarez-Ponce. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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