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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 5284586, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5284586
Research Article

Segmenting Brain Tissues from Chinese Visible Human Dataset by Deep-Learned Features with Stacked Autoencoder

1Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and Systems of Ministry of Education, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China
2College of Computer and Information Science, Chongqing Normal University, Chongqing 400050, China
3Institute of Digital Medicine, College of Biomedical Engineering, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038, China

Received 2 November 2015; Revised 18 December 2015; Accepted 27 December 2015

Academic Editor: Sher Afzal Khan

Copyright © 2016 Guangjun Zhao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Cryosection brain images in Chinese Visible Human (CVH) dataset contain rich anatomical structure information of tissues because of its high resolution (e.g., 0.167 mm per pixel). Fast and accurate segmentation of these images into white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid plays a critical role in analyzing and measuring the anatomical structures of human brain. However, most existing automated segmentation methods are designed for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging data, and they may not be applicable for cryosection images due to the imaging difference. In this paper, we propose a supervised learning-based CVH brain tissues segmentation method that uses stacked autoencoder (SAE) to automatically learn the deep feature representations. Specifically, our model includes two successive parts where two three-layer SAEs take image patches as input to learn the complex anatomical feature representation, and then these features are sent to Softmax classifier for inferring the labels. Experimental results validated the effectiveness of our method and showed that it outperformed four other classical brain tissue detection strategies. Furthermore, we reconstructed three-dimensional surfaces of these tissues, which show their potential in exploring the high-resolution anatomical structures of human brain.