Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 5657491, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5657491
Research Article

Cloning and Expression Analysis of One Gamma-Glutamylcysteine Synthetase Gene (Hbγ-ECS1) in Latex Production in Hevea brasiliensis

Key Laboratory of Biology and Genetic Resources of Rubber Tree, Ministry of Agriculture, Rubber Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences, Danzhou, Hainan 571737, China

Received 8 December 2015; Revised 8 March 2016; Accepted 16 May 2016

Academic Editor: Marta W. P. L. de Vasconcelos

Copyright © 2016 Wei Fang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. A. Dusotoit-Coucaud, P. Kongsawadworakul, L. Maurousset et al., “Ethylene stimulation of latex yield depends on the expression of a sucrose transporter (HbSUT1B) in rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis),” Tree Physiology, vol. 30, no. 12, pp. 1586–1598, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. F. Wei and X. Xiao, “Comparison on the physiological characters of three clones reyan7-33-97, PR107, RRIM600 of hevea brasiliensis,” Journal of Anhui Agrculture Science, vol. 36, no. 18, pp. 7561–7563, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  3. F. Wei, S. Luo, J. Qiu et al., “Function of thiols in rubber tree latex and recent researches on thiols anabolism pathway in model plant,” Tropical Agrculture Science and Technology, vol. 32, no. 8, pp. 12–17, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  4. J. D'auzac, J.-L. Jacob, and H. Chrestin, “Physiology of rubber tree latex,” in The Laticiferous Cell and Latex-A Model of Cytoplasm, CRC Press, New York, NY, USA, 1989. View at Google Scholar
  5. A. I. McMullen, “Thiols of low molecular weight in Hevea brasiliensis latex,” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 152–154, 1960. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. H. Chrestin, “Le compartiment vacuo-lysosomal (les lutoïdes) du latex d'Hevea Brasiliensis: son rôle dans le maintien de l'homéostasie et des les processus de sénescence des cellules laticifères,” 1984.
  7. C. H. Foyer, H. Lopez-Delgado, J. F. Dat, and I. M. Scott, “Hydrogen peroxide- and glutathione-associated mechanisms of acclimatory stress tolerance and signalling,” Physiologia Plantarum, vol. 100, no. 2, pp. 241–254, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. K. Ishikawa, K. Yoshimura, K. Harada et al., “AtNUDX6, an ADP-ribose/NADH pyrophosphohydrolase in Arabidopsis, positively regulates NPR1-dependent salicylic acid signaling,” Plant Physiology, vol. 152, no. 4, pp. 2000–2012, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. A. Mhamdi, J. Hager, S. Chaouch et al., “Arabidopsis GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE1 plays a crucial role in leaf responses to intracellular hydrogen peroxide and in ensuring appropriate gene expression through both salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling pathways,” Plant Physiology, vol. 153, no. 3, pp. 1144–1160, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. C. H. Foyer and G. Noctor, “Oxidant and antioxidant signalling in plants: a re-evaluation of the concept of oxidative stress in a physiological context,” Plant, Cell and Environment, vol. 28, no. 8, pp. 1056–1071, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. A. D. Peuke and H. Rennenberg, “Phytoremediation,” EMBO Reports, vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 497–501, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. R. B. Pereira, C. Sousa, A. Costa, P. B. Andrade, and P. Valentão, “Glutathione and the antioxidant potential of binary mixtures with flavonoids: synergisms and antagonisms,” Molecules, vol. 18, no. 8, pp. 8858–8872, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. G. Kocsy, G. Szalai, A. Vágújfalvi, L. Stéhli, G. Orosz, and G. Galiba, “Genetic study of glutathione accumulation during cold hardening in wheat,” Planta, vol. 210, no. 2, pp. 295–301, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. J. M. Ruiz and E. Blumwald, “Salinity-induced glutathione synthesis in Brassica napus,” Planta, vol. 214, no. 6, pp. 965–969, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. L. D. Gomez, G. Noctor, M. R. Knight, and C. H. Foyer, “Regulation of calcium signalling and gene expression by glutathione,” Journal of Experimental Botany, vol. 55, no. 404, pp. 1851–1859, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. S. Ghanta, D. Bhattacharyya, R. Sinha, A. Banerjee, and S. Chattopadhyay, “Nicotiana tabacum overexpressing γ-ECS exhibits biotic stress tolerance likely through NPR1-dependent salicylic acid-mediated pathway,” Planta, vol. 233, no. 5, pp. 895–910, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. G. Noctor, A.-C. M. Arisi, L. Jouanin, K. J. Kunert, H. Rennenberg, and C. H. Foyer, “Glutathione: biosynthesis, metabolism and relationship to stress tolerance explored in transformed plants,” Journal of Experimental Botany, vol. 49, no. 321, pp. 623–647, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. A. Galant, M. L. Preuss, J. C. Cameron, and J. M. Jez, “Plant glutathione biosynthesis: diversity in biochemical regulation and reaction products,” Frontiers in Plant Science, vol. 2, article 45, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. G. Noctor, A. Mhamdi, S. Chaouch et al., “Glutathione in plants: an integrated overview,” Plant, Cell and Environment, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 454–484, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. M. J. May and C. J. Leaver, “Arabidopsis thaliana γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase is structurally unrelated to mammalian, yeast, and Escherichia coli homologs,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 91, no. 21, pp. 10059–10063, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. H. J. Schäfer, S. Greiner, T. Rausch, and A. Haag-Kerwer, “In seedlings of the heavy metal accumulator Brassica juncea Cu2+ differentially affects transcript amounts for γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-ECS) and metallothionein (MT2),” FEBS Letters, vol. 404, no. 2-3, pp. 216–220, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. J. Wu, T. Qu, S. Chen, Z. Zhao, and L. An, “Molecular cloning and characterization of a γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene from Chorispora bungeana,” Protoplasma, vol. 235, no. 1–4, pp. 27–36, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. C. Xiang and D. J. Oliver, “Glutathione metabolic genes coordinately respond to heavy metals and jasmonic acid in Arabidopsis,” Plant Cell, vol. 10, no. 9, pp. 1539–1550, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. M.-J. Bae, Y.-S. Kim, I.-S. Kim et al., “Transgenic rice overexpressing the Brassica juncea gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene enhances tolerance to abiotic stress and improves grain yield under paddy field conditions,” Molecular Breeding, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 931–945, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. L. A. Ivanova, D. A. Ronzhina, L. A. Ivanov, L. V. Stroukova, A. D. Peuke, and H. Rennenberg, “Over-expression of gsh1 in the cytosol affects the photosynthetic apparatus and improves the performance of transgenic poplars on heavy metal-contaminated soil,” Plant Biology, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 649–659, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. C.-R. Wu, C.-W. Tsai, S.-W. Chang, C.-Y. Lin, L.-C. Huang, and C.-W. Tsai, “Carnosic acid protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in in vivo and in vitro model of Parkinson's disease: involvement of antioxidative enzymes induction,” Chemico-Biological Interactions, vol. 225, pp. 40–46, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. H. Li, J.-L. Han, J. Lin, Q.-S. Yang, and Y.-H. Chang, “A γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene from Pyrus calleryana is responsive to ions and osmotic stresses,” Plant Molecular Biology Reporter, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 1088–1097, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. A. Rüegsegger and C. Brunold, “Effect of cadmium on γ-glutamylcysteine synthesis in maize seedlings,” Plant Physiology, vol. 99, no. 2, pp. 428–433, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. D. Sengupta, G. Ramesh, S. Mudalkar, K. R. R. Kumar, P. B. Kirti, and A. R. Reddy, “Molecular Cloning and Characterization of γ-Glutamyl Cysteine Synthetase (VrγECS) from roots of vigna radiata (L.) wilczek under progressive drought stress and recovery,” Plant Molecular Biology Reporter, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 894–903, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. F. Wei, S. Luo, Q. Zheng et al., “Transcriptome sequencing and comparative analysis reveal long-term flowing mechanisms in Hevea brasiliensis latex,” Gene, vol. 556, no. 2, pp. 153–162, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. L. B. Poole, “The basics of thiols and cysteines in redox biology and chemistry,” Free Radical Biology & Medicine, vol. 80, pp. 148–157, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. M. Zermiani, E. Zonin, A. Nonis et al., “Ethylene negatively regulates transcript abundance of ROP-GAP rheostat-encoding genes and affects apoplastic reactive oxygen species homeostasis in epicarps of cold stored apple fruits,” Journal of Experimental Botany, vol. 66, no. 22, pp. 7255–7270, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  33. X. Gidrol, H. Chrestin, H.-L. Tan, and A. Kush, “Hevein, a lectin-like protein from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree) is involved in the coagulation of latex,” The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 269, no. 12, pp. 9278–9283, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. K. Ogawa, “Glutathione-associated regulation of plant growth and stress responses,” Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, vol. 7, no. 7-8, pp. 973–981, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. R. Sánchez-Fernández, M. Fricker, L. B. Corben et al., “Cell proliferation and hair tip growth in the Arabidopsis root are under mechanistically different forms of redox control,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 94, no. 6, pp. 2745–2750, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. C. Xiang, B. L. Werner, E. M. Christensen, and D. J. Oliver, “The biological functions of glutathione revisited in Arabidopsis transgenic plants with altered glutathione levels,” Plant Physiology, vol. 126, no. 2, pp. 564–574, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. G. Innocenti, C. Pucciariello, M. Le Gleuher et al., “Glutathione synthesis is regulated by nitric oxide in Medicago truncatula roots,” Planta, vol. 225, no. 6, pp. 1597–1602, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. D. Ke and A. Wang, “The effect of activated oxygen during the production of engenous ethylene induced by exogenous ethylene,” Plant Physiology Journal, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 67–72, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  39. X. Xiao, “Discussion of ethrel hurt and production mechanism in rubber tree,” Tropical Agrculture Science, no. 4, pp. 7–11, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  40. L. Cai and X. Xiao, “Production and eliminating of active oxygen in rubber tree laticifers,” Journal of South China University of Tropical Agriculture, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 31–34, 2000. View at Google Scholar