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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 6186281, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6186281
Review Article

Multi-OMICs and Genome Editing Perspectives on Liver Cancer Signaling Networks

1Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
2Cancer Biology Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
3Division of Biomedical Informatics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
4Department of Systems Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
5Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA

Received 1 January 2016; Revised 23 April 2016; Accepted 8 May 2016

Academic Editor: Eugenio Ferreira

Copyright © 2016 Shengda Lin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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