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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 6294098, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6294098
Research Article

Induction of Osmoregulation and Modulation of Salt Stress in Acacia gerrardii Benth. by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Bacillus subtilis (BERA 71)

1Department of Botany and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
2Mycology & Plant Disease Survey Department, Plant Pathology Research Institute, ARC, Giza 12511, Egypt
3Department of Plant Production, Faculty of Food & Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 2460, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
4Seed Pathology Department, Plant Pathology Research Institute, ARC, Giza 12511, Egypt
5Department of Botany, University of Kashmir, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir 190001, India

Received 11 May 2016; Accepted 27 June 2016

Academic Editor: Diby Paul

Copyright © 2016 Abeer Hashem et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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