Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 7496569, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7496569
Research Article

ChSte7 Is Required for Vegetative Growth and Various Plant Infection Processes in Colletotrichum higginsianum

The Key Laboratory of Plant Pathology of Hubei Province, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei 430070, China

Received 29 March 2016; Revised 19 May 2016; Accepted 30 June 2016

Academic Editor: Guo-Tian Li

Copyright © 2016 Qinfeng Yuan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. K. D. Hyde, L. Cai, P. F. Cannon et al., “Colletotrichum names in current use,” Fungal Diversity, vol. 39, pp. 147–182, 2009. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. X. Yang, H.-X. Feng, and Y.-S. Yang, “Effects of silicon on flowering Chinese cabbage's anthracnose occurence, flower stalk formation, and silicon uptake and accumulation,” Chinese Journal of Applied Ecology, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 1006–1012, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. Y. Narusaka, M. Narusaka, P. Park et al., “RCH1, a locus in Arabidopsis that confers resistance to the hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum,” Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, vol. 17, no. 7, pp. 749–762, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. R. J. O'Connell, C. Herbert, S. Sreenivasaprasad, M. Khatib, M.-T. Esquerré-Tugayé, and B. Dumas, “A novel Arabidopsis-Colletotrichum pathosystem for the molecular dissection of plant-fungal interactions,” Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 272–282, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. R. J. O'Connell, M. R. Thon, S. Hacquard et al., “Lifestyle transitions in plant pathogenic Colletotrichum fungi deciphered by genome and transcriptome analyses,” Nature Genetics, vol. 44, no. 9, pp. 1060–1065, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. J. Kleemann, L. J. Rincon-Rivera, H. Takahara et al., “Sequential delivery of host-induced virulence effectors by appressoria and intracellular hyphae of the phytopathogen colletotrichum higginsianum,” PLoS Pathogens, vol. 8, no. 4, Article ID e1002643, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. H. Takahara, A. Huser, and R. J. O'Connell, “Two arginine biosynthesis genes are essential for pathogenicity of Colletotrichum higginsianum on Arabidopsis,” Mycology, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 54–64, 2012. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. L. Liu, D. Zhao, L. Zheng et al., “Identification of virulence genes in the crucifer anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum higginsianum by insertional mutagenesis,” Microbial Pathogenesis, vol. 64, pp. 6–17, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. M. Korn, J. Schmidpeter, M. Dahl, S. Müller, L. M. Voll, and C. Koch, “A genetic screen for pathogenicity genes in the hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum higginsianum identifies the plasma membrane proton pump Pma2 required for host penetration,” PLoS ONE, vol. 10, no. 5, Article ID e0125960, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. M. G. Wilkinson and J. B. A. Millar, “Control of the eukaryotic cell cycle by MAP kinase signaling pathways,” FASEB Journal, vol. 14, no. 14, pp. 2147–2157, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. E. Nishida and Y. Gotoh, “The MAP kinase cascade is essential for diverse signal transduction pathways,” Trends in Biochemical Sciences, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 128–131, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. M. C. Gustin, J. Albertyn, M. Alexander, and K. Davenport, “Map kinase pathways in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae,” Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews, vol. 62, no. 4, pp. 1264–1300, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. D. Turrà, D. Segorbe, and A. Di Pietro, “Protein kinases in plant-pathogenic Fungi: Conserved regulators of infection,” Annual Review of Phytopathology, vol. 52, pp. 267–288, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. B. Errede, A. Gartner, Z. Zhou, K. Nasmyth, and G. Ammerer, “MAP kinase-related FUS3 from S. cerevisiae is activated by STE7 in vitro,” Nature, vol. 362, no. 6417, pp. 261–264, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. J.-R. Xu and J. E. Hamer, “MAP kinase and cAMP signaling regulate infection structure formation and pathogenic growth in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea,” Genes and Development, vol. 10, no. 21, pp. 2696–2706, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. K. S. Bruno, F. Tenjo, L. Li, J. E. Hamer, and J.-R. Xu, “Cellular localization and role of kinase activity of PMK1 in Magnaporthe grisea,” Eukaryotic Cell, vol. 3, no. 6, pp. 1525–1532, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. S. J. Zhang, C. Jiang, Q. Zhang, L. L. Qi, C. H. Li, and J.-R. Xu, “Thioredoxins are involved in the activation of the PMK1 MAP kinase pathway during appressorium penetration and invasive growth in Magnaporthe oryzae,” Environmental Microbiology, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  18. Y. Takano, T. Kikuchi, Y. Kubo, J. E. Hamer, K. Mise, and I. Furusawa, “The Colletotrichum lagenarium MAP kinase gene CMK1 regulates diverse aspects of fungal pathogenesis,” Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 374–383, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. M. E. Mayorga and S. E. Gold, “A MAP kinase encoded by the ubc3 gene of Ustilago maydis is required for filamentous growth and full virulence,” Molecular Microbiology, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 485–497, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. P. Müller, C. Aichinger, M. Feldbrügge, and R. Kahmann, “The MAP kinase Kpp2 regulates mating and pathogenic development in Ustilago maydis,” Molecular Microbiology, vol. 34, no. 5, pp. 1007–1017, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. L. Zheng, M. Campbell, J. Murphy, S. Lam, and J.-R. Xu, “The BMP11 gene is essential for pathogenicity in the gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea,” Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, vol. 13, no. 7, pp. 724–732, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. X. Zhao, R. Mehrabi, and J.-R. Xu, “Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and fungal pathogenesis,” Eukaryotic Cell, vol. 6, no. 10, pp. 1701–1714, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. J.-R. Xu, “MAP kinases in fungal pathogens,” Fungal Genetics and Biology, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 137–152, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. Y. Kitade, T. Sumita, K. Izumitsu, and C. Tanaka, “MAPKK-encoding gene Ste7 in Bipolaris maydis is required for development and morphogenesis,” Mycoscience, vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 150–158, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. Y.-K. Kim, T. Kawano, D. X. Li, and P. E. Kolattukudy, “A mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase required for induction of cytokinesis and appressorium formation by host signals in the conidia of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides,” Plant Cell, vol. 12, no. 8, pp. 1331–1343, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. F. Banuett and I. Herskowitz, “Identification of fuz7, a Ustilago maydis MEK/MAPKK homolog required for a-locus-dependent and -independent steps in the fungal life cycle,” Genes and Development, vol. 8, no. 12, pp. 1367–1378, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. X. H. Zhao and J.-R. Xu, “A highly conserved MAPK-docking site in Mst7 is essential for Pmk1 activation in Magnaporthe grisea,” Molecular Microbiology, vol. 63, no. 3, pp. 881–894, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. X. Zhao, Y. Kim, G. Park, and J.-R. Xu, “A mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade regulating infection-related morphogenesis in Magnaporthe grisea,” Plant Cell, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 1317–1329, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. G. Li, X. Zhou, and J.-R. Xu, “Genetic control of infection-related development in Magnaporthe oryzae,” Current Opinion in Microbiology, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 678–684, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  30. M. Li, X. Gong, J. Zheng, D. Jiang, Y. Fu, and M. Hou, “Transformation of Coniothyrium minitans, a parasite of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, with Agrobacterium tumefaciens,” FEMS Microbiology Letters, vol. 243, no. 2, pp. 323–329, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. Y.-G. Liu and Y. Chen, “High-efficiency thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR for amplification of unknown flanking sequences,” BioTechniques, vol. 43, no. 5, pp. 649–656, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. J. Sambrook, E. F. Fritsch, and T. Maniatis, Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual (2nd Edition), Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, New York, NY, USA, 1989.
  33. L.-P. Hamel, M.-C. Nicole, S. Duplessis, and B. E. Ellis, “Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in plant-interacting fungi: distinct messages from conserved messengers,” The Plant Cell, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 1327–1351, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. A. Schamber, M. Leroch, J. Diwo, K. Mendgen, and M. Hahn, “The role of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling components and the Ste12 transcription factor in germination and pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea,” Molecular Plant Pathology, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 105–119, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. A. Sakaguchi, G. Tsuji, and Y. Kubo, “A yeast STE11 homologue CoMEKK1 is essential for pathogenesis-related morphogenesis in Colletotrichum orbiculare,” Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, vol. 23, no. 12, pp. 1563–1572, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. K. Izumitsu, A. Yoshimi, D. Kubo, A. Morita, Y. Saitoh, and C. Tanaka, “The MAPKK kinase ChSte11 regulates sexual/asexual development, melanization, pathogenicity, and adaptation to oxidative stress in Cochliobolus heterostrophus,” Current Genetics, vol. 55, no. 4, pp. 439–448, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. S. Lev, A. Sharon, R. Hadar, H. Ma, and B. A. Horwitz, “A mitogen-activated protein kinase of the corn leaf pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus is involved in conidiation, appressorium formation, and pathogenicity: diverse roles for mitogen-activated protein kinase homologs in foliar pathogens,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 96, no. 23, pp. 13542–13547, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. A. M. Neiman and I. Herskowitz, “Reconstitution of a yeast protein kinase cascade in vitro: activation of the yeast MEK homologue STE7 by STE11,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 91, no. 8, pp. 3398–3402, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. L. Bardwell, J. G. Cook, E. C. Chang, B. R. Cairns, and J. Thorner, “Signaling in the yeast pheromone response pathway: specific and high-affinity interaction of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases Kss1 and Fus3 with the upstream MAP kinase kinase Ste7,” Molecular and Cellular Biology, vol. 16, no. 7, pp. 3637–3650, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. T. Maeda, M. Takekawa, and H. Saito, “Activation of yeast PBS2 MAPKK by MAPKKKs or by binding of an SH3-containing osmosensor,” Science, vol. 269, no. 5223, pp. 554–558, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. V. Reiser, S. M. Salah, and G. Ammerer, “Polarized localization of yeast Pbs2 depends on osmostress, the membrane protein Sho1 and Cdc42,” Nature Cell Biology, vol. 2, no. 9, pp. 620–627, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. D. C. Raitt, F. Posas, and H. Saito, “Yeast Cdc42 GTPase and Ste20 PAK-like kinase regulate Sho1-dependent activation of the Hog1 MAPK pathway,” The EMBO Journal, vol. 19, no. 17, pp. 4623–4631, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. K. Furukawa, Y. Hoshi, T. Maeda, T. Nakajima, and K. Abe, “Aspergillus nidulans HOG pathway is activated only by two-component signalling pathway in response to osmotic stress,” Molecular Microbiology, vol. 56, no. 5, pp. 1246–1261, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. M. Krantz, E. Becit, and S. Hohmann, “Comparative analysis of HOG pathway proteins to generate hypotheses for functional analysis,” Current Genetics, vol. 49, no. 3, pp. 152–165, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus