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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7627358, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7627358
Research Article

Agreement among Four Prevalence Metrics for Urogenital Schistosomiasis in the Eastern Region of Ghana

1Department of Community Health, Tufts University School of Arts and Sciences, 574 Boston Avenue, Medford, MA 02155, USA
2Initiative for the Forecasting and Modeling of Infectious Diseases, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA
3Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tufts University School of Engineering, Medford, MA 02155, USA
4Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111, USA
5Department of Parasitology, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research (NMIMR), University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG581, Legon, Ghana
6Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111, USA

Received 2 August 2016; Revised 27 September 2016; Accepted 8 November 2016

Academic Editor: Charles Spencer

Copyright © 2016 Karen Claire Kosinski et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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