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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7681259, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7681259
Research Article

Altered Expression of EPO Might Underlie Hepatic Hemangiomas in LRRK2 Knockout Mice

The State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Central South University, No. 110 Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan 410078, China

Received 2 July 2016; Accepted 11 October 2016

Academic Editor: Arianna Scuteri

Copyright © 2016 Ben Wu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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