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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 7867852, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7867852
Research Article

Advanced Glycation End Products Induce Obesity and Hepatosteatosis in CD-1 Wild-Type Mice

1Digestive Diseases, Hepatology and Nutrition Center, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, Hartford, CT 06106, USA
2University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT 06032, USA
3Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA
4Veterans Administration Western New York Healthcare System, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14215, USA
5Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA
6Department of Surgery, University at Buffalo-SUNY School of Medicine, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA
7Departments of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Buffalo, NY 14228, USA
8Department of Rehabilitation Science, University at Buffalo-SUNY School of Medicine, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA
9Department of Pediatric Pathology, Women & Children’s Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14203, USA
10Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Center, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Women & Children’s Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14222, USA

Received 1 December 2015; Accepted 10 January 2016

Academic Editor: Yanwen Wang

Copyright © 2016 Wael N. Sayej et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

AGEs are a heterogeneous group of molecules formed from the nonenzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with free amino groups of proteins, lipids, and/or nucleic acids. AGEs have been shown to play a role in various conditions including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. In this study, we hypothesized that AGEs play a role in the “multiple hit hypothesis” of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and contribute to the pathogenesis of hepatosteatosis. We measured the effects of various mouse chows containing high or low AGE in the presence of high or low fat content on mouse weight and epididymal fat pads. We also measured the effects of these chows on the inflammatory response by measuring cytokine levels and myeloperoxidase activity levels on liver supernatants. We observed significant differences in weight gain and epididymal fat pad weights in the high AGE-high fat (HAGE-HF) versus the other groups. Leptin, TNF-α, IL-6, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels were significantly higher in the HAGE-HF group. We conclude that a diet containing high AGEs in the presence of high fat induces weight gain and hepatosteatosis in CD-1 mice. This may represent a model to study the role of AGEs in the pathogenesis of hepatosteatosis and steatohepatitis.