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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 8090918, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8090918
Review Article

CX3CL1/CX3CR1 in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Target for Neuroprotection

1School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240, China
2Department of Neurology, Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 100 Haining Road, Shanghai 200080, China

Received 18 March 2016; Accepted 5 June 2016

Academic Editor: Tauheed Ishrat

Copyright © 2016 Peiqing Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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