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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 8485721, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8485721
Research Article

Effect of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor on Endothelial Cells and Osteoblasts

1Discipline of Oral Diagnosis and Polyclinics, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
2Discipline of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
3Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Guanghua School and Research Institute of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510000, China
4Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Received 10 November 2015; Revised 28 January 2016; Accepted 31 January 2016

Academic Editor: Alessandro Isidori

Copyright © 2016 Xi Ling Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objectives. Some animal studies showed that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) provides beneficial environment for bone healing. It has been well documented that endothelial cells and osteoblasts play critical roles in multiple phases of bone healing. However, the biological effects of G-CSF on these cells remain controversial. This study aimed to investigate the influence of G-CSF at various concentrations on endothelial cells and osteoblasts. Materials and Methods. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human osteoblasts (hOBs) were treated with G-CSF at 1000, 100, 10, and 0 ng/mL, respectively. The capacity of cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation of HUVECs was evaluated at 72, 8, and 6 hours after treatment, respectively. The capacity of proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of hOBs was evaluated at 24 hours, 72 hours, and 21 days after treatment, respectively. Results. HUVECs treated with 100 and 1000 ng/mL G-CSF showed a significantly higher value comparing with controls in migration assay (, , resp.); the group treated with 1000 ng/mL G-CSF showed a significantly lower value on tube formation. No significant difference was detected in groups of hOBs. Conclusions. G-CSF showed favorable effects only on the migration of HUVECs, and no direct influence was found on hOBs.