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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 9085273, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9085273
Research Article

Systematic Analysis of the Cytokine and Anhedonia Response to Peripheral Lipopolysaccharide Administration in Rats

1BIOMED, Hasselt University, Agoralaan C Building, 3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium
2Neuroscience, Janssen Research & Development, Division of Janssen Pharmaceutica NV, Turnhoutseweg 30, 2340 Beerse, Belgium

Received 17 February 2016; Revised 27 May 2016; Accepted 14 June 2016

Academic Editor: Monica Fedele

Copyright © 2016 Steven Biesmans et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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