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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 9231057, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9231057
Review Article

Functions of the Tumor Suppressors p53 and Rb in Actin Cytoskeleton Remodeling

1Frontiers of Innovative Research in Science and Technology, Konan University, 7-1-20 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047, Japan
2Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550, Japan
3Department of Molecular Oncology, Institute for Advanced Medical Sciences, Nippon Medical School, 1-396 Kosugi-cho, Nakahara-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 211-8533, Japan

Received 8 September 2016; Accepted 21 November 2016

Academic Editor: Wuyuan Lu

Copyright © 2016 Takahiro Ebata et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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