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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 9702129, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9702129
Research Article

Preparation of Thermosensitive Gel for Controlled Release of Levofloxacin and Their Application in the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria

1Laboratory of Biotechnology (LABIOTEC), Institute of Biology, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP, Brazil
2Laboratory of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine (LNMed), Institute of Technology and Research (ITP), Aracaju, SE, Brazil
3Tiradentes University (UNIT), Aracaju, SE, Brazil
4Center of Natural Sciences and Humanities, Federal University of ABC (UFABC), Santo André, SP, Brazil
5Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP, Brazil

Received 8 April 2016; Revised 30 June 2016; Accepted 25 July 2016

Academic Editor: Sophia Antimisiaris

Copyright © 2016 Danilo Antonini Alves et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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