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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 9750795, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9750795
Review Article

Mouse Models in Prostate Cancer Translational Research: From Xenograft to PDX

1Animal Facility Unit, Department of Experimental Oncology, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori “Fondazione G. Pascale”, IRCCS, 80131 Naples, Italy
2Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples, Italy
3Department of Urology, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori “Fondazione G. Pascale”, IRCCS, 80131 Naples, Italy
4Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Uro-Gynaecological Oncology, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori “Fondazione G. Pascale”, IRCCS, 80131 Naples, Italy

Received 17 March 2016; Accepted 21 April 2016

Academic Editor: Oreste Gualillo

Copyright © 2016 Domenica Rea et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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