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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 1549194, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1549194
Review Article

Proximate Mediators of Microvascular Dysfunction at the Blood-Brain Barrier: Neuroinflammatory Pathways to Neurodegeneration

1PHLOGISTIX LLC, 4220 Shawnee Mission Parkway, Fairway, KS 66205, USA
2Department of Neurology, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, 1300 S. Coulter Street, Amarillo, TX 79106, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Barry W. Festoff and Luca Cucullo

Received 28 April 2017; Accepted 9 July 2017; Published 14 August 2017

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Donato

Copyright © 2017 Barry W. Festoff et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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