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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 2014583, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2014583
Research Article

Early Production of the Neutrophil-Derived Lipid Mediators LTB4 and LXA4 Is Modulated by Intracellular Infection with Leishmania major

Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Tamás Laskay; ed.hsku@yaksal.samat

Received 24 May 2017; Revised 22 August 2017; Accepted 12 September 2017; Published 18 October 2017

Academic Editor: Remo Lobetti

Copyright © 2017 Michael Plagge and Tamás Laskay. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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