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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 2432957, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2432957
Research Article

Copy Number Variations in Candidate Genes and Intergenic Regions Affect Body Mass Index and Abdominal Obesity in Mexican Children

1Laboratorio de Investigación en Epidemiología Clínica y Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, 39089 Chilpancingo, GRO, Mexico
2Unidad de Investigación Médica en Bioquímica, Hospital de Especialidades “Bernardo Sepúlveda”, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, 06725 Ciudad de México, Mexico
3Centro de Investigación sobre Enfermedades Infecciosas, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, 62100 Cuernavaca, MOR, Mexico
4CNRS-UMR8199, Lille Pasteur Institute, Lille, France
5Lille University, Lille, France
6European Genomic Institute for Diabetes (EGID), 3508 Lille, France
7Department of Genomics of Common Disease, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK
8Laboratorio de Genómica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, 39089 Chilpancingo, GRO, Mexico

Correspondence should be addressed to Miguel Cruz; moc.oohay@lzurcm

Received 6 November 2016; Revised 26 January 2017; Accepted 6 February 2017; Published 27 March 2017

Academic Editor: Sarah H. Elsea

Copyright © 2017 Diana Lizzete Antúnez-Ortiz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Increase in body weight is a gradual process that usually begins in childhood and in adolescence as a result of multiple interactions among environmental and genetic factors. This study aimed to analyze the relationship between copy number variants (CNVs) in five genes and four intergenic regions with obesity in Mexican children. Methods. We studied 1423 children aged 6–12 years. Anthropometric measurements and blood levels of biochemical parameters were obtained. Identification of CNVs was performed by real-time PCR. The effect of CNVs on obesity or body composition was assessed using regression models adjusted for age, gender, and family history of obesity. Results. Gains in copy numbers of LEPR and NEGR1 were associated with decreased body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and risk of abdominal obesity, whereas gain in ARHGEF4 and CPXCR1 and the intergenic regions 12q15c, 15q21.1a, and 22q11.21d and losses in INS were associated with increased BMI and WC. Conclusion. Our results indicate a possible contribution of CNVs in LEPR, NEGR1, ARHGEF4, and CPXCR1 and the intergenic regions 12q15c, 15q21.1a, and 22q11.21d to the development of obesity, particularly abdominal obesity in Mexican children.