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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3149536, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3149536
Research Article

Sodium Mercaptoethane Sulfonate Reduces Collagenolytic Degradation and Synergistically Enhances Antimicrobial Durability in an Antibiotic-Loaded Biopolymer Film for Prevention of Surgical-Site Infections

1Department of Infectious Diseases, Infection Control and Employee Health, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2Department of Plastic Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Joel Rosenblatt; gro.nosrednadm@ttalbnesorsj

Received 23 June 2017; Accepted 9 October 2017; Published 7 November 2017

Academic Editor: Hyuk Sang Yoo

Copyright © 2017 Joel Rosenblatt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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