Table 4: Layperson responses to the hypothetical cardiac arrest scenarios.

Layperson responsesAllMaleFemale value

If you find someone who has cardiac arrest, you will0.002
 Ask for help and perform CPR1096 (59.5%)562 (62.1%)534 (57.1%)
 Ask for help only420 (22.8%)174 (19.2%)246 (26.3%)
 Perform CPR only274 (14.9%)149 (16.5)125 (13.4)
 Do not know how to do48 (2.6%)19 (2.1%)29 (3.1%)
 Others3 (0.2%)1 (0.1%)2 (0.2%)
If you experience cardiac arrest in public area, the person you wish to perform CPR on you0.806
 Bystander994 (54.0%)486 (53.7%)508 (54.3%)
 Medical staff or trained people only847 (46.0%)419 (46.3%)428 (45.7%)
When you witness a family member/stranger confronting cardiac arrest, you will perform CPR to0.094
 Both of them1395 (75.8%)696 (76.9%)699 (74.7%)
 Family member only421 (22.9%)192 (21.2%)229 (24.5%)
 Stranger only10 (0.5%)6 (0.7%)4 (0.4%)
 Neither15 (0.8%)11 (1.2%)4 (0.4%)
While performing CPR on a stranger, you will worry about<0.001
 Legal issues980 (53.2%)537 (59.3%)443 (47.3%)
 Inadequate knowledge and skill of CPR817 (44.4%)344 (38.0%)473 (50.5%)
 Disease transmission33 (1.8%)18 (2.0%)15 (1.6%)
 Others11 (0.6%)6 (0.7%)5 (0.5%)
If a family member has cardiac arrest, but bystander CPR failed, will you prosecute for liability<0.001
 Yes252 (13.7%)140 (15.5%)113 (12.1%)
 No1085 (58.9%)560 (61.9%)525 (56.1%)
 Uncertain503 (27.3%)205 (22.7%)298 (31.8%)
If laws were implemented to prevent prosecuting for liability, will you perform CPR on strangers0.029
 Yes1629 (88.5%)812 (89.7%)817 (87.3%)
 No45 (2.4%)26 (2.9%)19 (2.0%)
 Uncertain167 (9.1%)67 (7.4%)100 (10.7%)

, statistically significant difference between genders for each question.