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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 3507671, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3507671
Review Article

Genotyping the High Altitude Mestizo Ecuadorian Population Affected with Prostate Cancer

1Centro de Investigación Genética y Genómica, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud Eugenio Espejo, Universidad Tecnológica Equinoccial, Avenue Mariscal Sucre, 170129 Quito, Ecuador
2Gene Regulation, Stem Cells and Cancer Programme, Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), The Barcelona Institute for Science and Technology, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Dr. Aiguader 88 Street, 08003 Barcelona, Spain

Correspondence should be addressed to Andrés López-Cortés; moc.liamg@48claa

Received 21 December 2016; Accepted 15 May 2017; Published 8 June 2017

Academic Editor: Gianluigi Taverna

Copyright © 2017 Andrés López-Cortés et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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