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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 3631624, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3631624
Clinical Study

Can Rehabilitation Influence the Efficiency of Control Signals in Complex Motion Strategies?

1Department of Physiotherapy in Neurological and Musculoskeletal Disorders, J. Kukuczka Academy of Physical Education, Katowice, Poland
2Department of Tourism and Health-Related Physical Activity, J. Kukuczka Academy of Physical Education, Katowice, Poland
3Department of Neurology and Department of Neurorehabilitation, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
4Department of Methodology, Statistics and Computer Science, J. Kukuczka Academy of Physical Education, Katowice, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Jaroslaw Cholewa; lp.eciwotak.fwa@awelohc.j

Received 18 November 2016; Revised 9 March 2017; Accepted 9 April 2017; Published 24 May 2017

Academic Editor: Pablo Mir

Copyright © 2017 Joanna Cholewa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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