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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3839012, 8 pages
Research Article

Cryoablation of Primary Breast Cancer in Patients with Metastatic Disease: Considerations Arising from a Single-Centre Data Analysis

1Division of Interventional Radiology, Oncological Hospital “A. Businco”, Cagliari, Italy
2Division of Nuclear Medicine, Oncological Hospital “A. Businco”, Cagliari, Italy
3Unit of Medical Oncology, Hospital “SS. Annunziata”, Sassari, Italy
4Unit of General Surgery 2, Clinica Chirurgica, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Alessandro Fancellu

Received 26 April 2017; Accepted 24 September 2017; Published 19 October 2017

Academic Editor: Adewale Adeyinka

Copyright © 2017 Claudio Pusceddu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Background. Patients presenting with stage IV breast cancer might benefit by removal of the primary tumor. We report our experience with CT-guided cryoablation of the primary tumor, with the aim of evaluating its role in this subgroup of patients. Patients and Methods. Data of 35 patients with mean age of 58 years with breast cancer at stage IV submitted to CT-guided cryoablation of the primary tumor between 2010 and 2016 were prospectively evaluated. All patients, except three, were preoperatively and postoperatively evaluated with breast MRI to assess the extent of tumor necrosis. Retreatment was performed in case of incomplete ablation. Results. Mean tumor size was 3.02 ± 1.4 cm. Six patients had multicentric disease. Complete tumor necrosis was 85.7% and 100% at 2-month and 6-month follow-up, respectively, as 5 patients with tumors > 3 cm required a redo cryoablation. No patient developed major complications. Minor side effects occurred in 30 patients (82%). All patients were discharged the same day of the procedure. During a mean follow-up of 46 months (range 3–84), 7 patients (20%) experienced local recurrences that were treated with redo cryoablation, and 7 (20%) died for disease progression. Conclusions. Our results suggest that cryoablation of the primary tumor is safe and effective in the treatment of patients presenting with stage IV breast cancer.