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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 3974651, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3974651
Research Article

Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes and Factors Associated with Each of Them in a Cohort Followed Up between 2010 and 2014

1Postgraduate Program Clinical Research in Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Infectious Diseases Evandro Chagas-Fiocruz, Manguinhos, RJ, Brazil
2Clinical Research Laboratory on Immunizations and Surveillance, National Institute of Infectious Diseases Evandro Chagas-Fiocruz, Manguinhos, RJ, Brazil
3Clinical Research Laboratory on Mycobacteria, National Institute of Infectious Diseases Evandro Chagas-Fiocruz, Manguinhos, RJ, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Valeria C. Rolla; moc.liamg@allor.airelav

Received 11 August 2017; Revised 25 November 2017; Accepted 7 December 2017; Published 28 December 2017

Academic Editor: Isabel Portugal

Copyright © 2017 Mayara A. Cardoso et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Tuberculosis treatment has undergone recent changes in Brazil. Objective. To assess whether favorable outcomes on tuberculosis therapy improved in recent years. Methods. Retrospective observational study, based on primary data of tuberculosis patients, followed at INI-FIOCRUZ, from January 2012 to December 2014. Results. The outcomes observed were as follows: cure (80%), default (14%), treatment failure (5%), and death (1%). HIV infection without antiretroviral therapy [OR 0.34 (0.15–0.79)], tuberculosis diagnosis based on sputum smear [OR 0.22 (0.07–0.74)], drug use [OR 0.22 (0.11–0.46)], and/or treatment interruption due to adverse reactions [OR 0.23 (0.08–0.67)] decreased the chance of cure. Predictors of default, that is, use of noninjecting drugs [OR 3.00 (95% CL 1.31–6.88)], treatment interruption due to adverse reactions [OR 6.30 (1.81–21.95)], low schooling [OR 2.59 (2.15–5.82)], higher age [OR 0.44 (0.23–0.82)], and female gender [OR 0.28 (0.11–0.71)], reduced the chance of treatment default. Tuberculosis diagnosis based on sputum smear [OR 7.77 (1.94–31.09)] and/or arterial hypertension [OR 4.07 (1.25–13.18)] was associated with treatment failure. Conclusion. Mortality and default were low considering the prevalence of HIV infection; however cure was not significantly increased.