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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 4101580, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4101580
Research Article

A Novel Cyclophilin B Gene in the Red Tide Dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides: Molecular Characterizations and Transcriptional Responses to Environmental Stresses

1Department of Biotechnology, Sangmyung University, Seoul 03016, Republic of Korea
2Institute of Natural Sciences, Sangmyung University, Seoul 03016, Republic of Korea
3Ocean Climate and Ecology Research Division, National Institute of Fisheries Science, Busan 46083, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Jang-Seu Ki; rk.ca.ums@sjik

Received 29 April 2017; Accepted 13 September 2017; Published 26 October 2017

Academic Editor: Atanas Atanassov

Copyright © 2017 Sofia Abassi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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