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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 4368474, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4368474
Review Article

Association between Antihypertensive Drug Use and the Incidence of Cognitive Decline and Dementia: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

1Department of Cardiology, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou 730030, China
2Department of Urology, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou 730030, China
3Department of Cardiac Surgery, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou 730030, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Bingren Gao; moc.anis@oagnergnib

Received 8 May 2017; Revised 28 June 2017; Accepted 27 July 2017; Published 28 September 2017

Academic Editor: Cristiano Capurso

Copyright © 2017 Guangli Xu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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