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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 4378328, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4378328
Research Article

Impact of Fish Oil Supplementation and Interruption of Fructose Ingestion on Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis of Rats Drinking Different Concentrations of Fructose

1Department of Physiological Sciences, Center of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 8840-900 Florianópolis, SC, Brazil
2Multicenter Graduate Program in Physiological Sciences, Center of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 8840-900 Florianópolis, SC, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Alex Rafacho; rb.csfu@ohcafar.xela

Received 23 April 2017; Revised 20 June 2017; Accepted 28 June 2017; Published 8 August 2017

Academic Editor: Paul M. Tulkens

Copyright © 2017 Paola M. Sulis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Continuous fructose consumption may cause elevation of circulating triacylglycerol. However, how much of this alteration is reverted after the removal of fructose intake is not known. We explored this question and compared the efficacy of this approach with fish oil supplementation. Methods. Male Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: control (C), fructose (F) (water intake with 10% or 30% fructose for 9 weeks), fish oil (FO), and fructose/fish oil (FFO). Fish oil was supplemented only for the last 33 days of fructose ingestion. Half of the F group remained for additional 8 weeks without fructose ingestion (FR). Results. Fructose ingestion reduced food intake to compensate for the increased energy obtained through water ingestion, independent of fructose concentration. Fish oil supplementation exerted no impact on these parameters, but the removal of fructose from water recovered both ingestion behaviors. Plasma triacylglycerol augmented significantly during the second and third weeks (both fructose groups). Fish oil supplementation did not attenuate the elevation in triacylglycerol caused by fructose intake, but the interruption of sugar consumption normalized this parameter. Conclusion. Elevation in triacylglyceridemia may be recovered by removing fructose from diet, suggesting that it is never too late to repair improper dietary habits.