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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 4378627, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4378627
Research Article

Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Genes Mediating Salt Tolerance through Calcineurin/CchA-Independent Signaling in Aspergillus nidulans

1Department of Pathogen and Immunity, School of Medicine, Huzhou University, Zhejiang, China
2Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital of Huangyan, Zhejiang, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Shengwen Shao; nc.ude.uhjz@whsoahs

Received 17 March 2017; Revised 1 June 2017; Accepted 10 July 2017; Published 20 August 2017

Academic Editor: Stanley Brul

Copyright © 2017 Sha Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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