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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 4391920, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4391920
Research Article

Uric Acid Induces Endothelial Dysfunction by Activating the HMGB1/RAGE Signaling Pathway

1Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006, China
2Department of Medical Genetics and Cell Biology, Medical College of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006, China
3Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, People’s Hospital of Shangrao City, Shangrao, Jiangxi 334600, China
4Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330003, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Ji-Xiong Xu; moc.361@gnoixijux

Received 3 July 2016; Revised 25 October 2016; Accepted 6 November 2016; Published 1 January 2017

Academic Editor: Senthil K. Venugopal

Copyright © 2017 Wei Cai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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