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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 4673047, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4673047
Research Article

The Influence of Recognition and Social Support on European Health Professionals’ Occupational Stress: A Demands-Control-Social Support-Recognition Bayesian Network Model

1Escuela Politécnica Superior, University of Burgos, Avda. Cantabria s/n, 09006 Burgos, Spain
2Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Sciences, University of Cantabria, Santander, Spain

Correspondence should be addressed to Susana García-Herrero; se.ubu@hganasus

Received 2 June 2017; Revised 11 September 2017; Accepted 3 October 2017; Published 9 November 2017

Academic Editor: Giorgi Gabriele

Copyright © 2017 Susana García-Herrero et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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