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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 4820275, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4820275
Research Article

MicroRNA Expression Signature in Human Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

1Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China
2Cardiac Regeneration and Ageing Lab, School of Life Science, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Xiangqing Kong; moc.361@jn_gnokgniqgnaix and Yihua Bei; moc.361@hs_iebauhiy

Received 12 September 2016; Accepted 13 February 2017; Published 11 April 2017

Academic Editor: Giovanni Mariscalco

Copyright © 2017 Hui Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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