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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 4856527, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4856527
Research Article

Informing Nutrition Care in the Antenatal Period: Pregnant Women’s Experiences and Need for Support

1School of Health and Society, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
2School of Nursing, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
3School of Nursing and Midwifery, CQUniversity, North Rockhampton, QLD, Australia

Correspondence should be addressed to Khlood Bookari; ua.ude.liamwou@193bk

Received 3 April 2017; Accepted 19 June 2017; Published 14 August 2017

Academic Editor: Sabine Rohrmann

Copyright © 2017 Khlood Bookari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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