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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5246853, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5246853
Review Article

Mitochondrial-Targeted Molecular Imaging in Cardiac Disease

Jinhui Li,1,2,3,4,5 Jing Lu,6,7 and You Zhou1

1Department of Chinese Medicine & Rehabilitation, Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou 310009, China
2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou 310009, China
3Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009, China
4Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009, China
5Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou 310009, China
6Department of Neurobiology, Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of Ministry of Health of China, Hangzhou, China
7Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Mental Disorder’s Management, Department of Psychiatry, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China

Correspondence should be addressed to You Zhou; moc.liamxof@8181uoyuohz

Received 1 January 2017; Accepted 6 February 2017; Published 30 May 2017

Academic Editor: David J. Yang

Copyright © 2017 Jinhui Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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