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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 5284628, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5284628
Research Article

Associations of Occupational Stressors, Perceived Organizational Support, and Psychological Capital with Work Engagement among Chinese Female Nurses

1Department of Sport Medicine, School of Fundamental Sciences, China Medical University, No. 77 Puhe Road, Shenyang North New Area, Shenyang, Liaoning 110122, China
2Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, China Medical University, No. 77 Puhe Road, Shenyang North New Area, Shenyang, Liaoning 110122, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Hui Wu; nc.ude.umc@uwh

Received 27 July 2016; Revised 21 November 2016; Accepted 19 December 2016; Published 12 January 2017

Academic Editor: Adam Reich

Copyright © 2017 Xiaoxi Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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