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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 5383574, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5383574
Research Article

Postoperative Compensatory Ammonium Excretion Subsequent to Systemic Acidosis in Cardiac Patients

1Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, Essen, 45147 North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
2Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, West German Heart Center, University Hospital Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, Essen, 45147 North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Johanna K. Teloh; ed.nesse-ku@holet.annahoj

Received 19 January 2017; Revised 1 March 2017; Accepted 26 April 2017; Published 22 May 2017

Academic Editor: Francesco Onorati

Copyright © 2017 Friederike Roehrborn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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