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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 5615647, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5615647
Review Article

Green Tea Extracts Epigallocatechin-3-gallate for Different Treatments

1State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China
2Department of Oral Implantology, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yi Man; moc.621@302087iynam and Yili Qu; moc.621@iliyqq

Received 18 April 2017; Accepted 28 June 2017; Published 13 August 2017

Academic Editor: Tong Li

Copyright © 2017 Chenyu Chu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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