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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5635070, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5635070
Research Article

Effects of Structured Physical Activity Program on Chinese Young Children’s Executive Functions and Perceived Physical Competence in a Day Care Center

1Department of Physical Education, Shenzhen Polytechnic University, Shenzhen, China
2School of Physical Education, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, China
3School of Physical Education, Huaihua University, Huaihua, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Shanying Xiong and Xianxiong Li

Received 23 August 2017; Revised 29 September 2017; Accepted 4 October 2017; Published 7 November 2017

Academic Editor: Xu Wen

Copyright © 2017 Shanying Xiong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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