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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 5724069, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5724069
Review Article

Antiangiogenic Therapy for Diabetic Nephropathy

1Department of Nephrology, Rheumatology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700-8558, Japan
2Department of Vascular Biology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Katsuyuki Tanabe; pj.ca.u-amayako@kebanat

Received 30 March 2017; Revised 16 May 2017; Accepted 13 June 2017; Published 1 August 2017

Academic Editor: Sebastian Oltean

Copyright © 2017 Katsuyuki Tanabe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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