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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5813793, 15 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5813793
Review Article

Therapeutic Potential of Epigallocatechin Gallate Nanodelivery Systems

UCIBIO, REQUIMTE, Department of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal

Correspondence should be addressed to Marina Pinheiro

Received 31 March 2017; Revised 30 May 2017; Accepted 8 June 2017; Published 16 July 2017

Academic Editor: Sanyog Jain

Copyright © 2017 Andreia Granja et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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